e-mail: dweis@eos.ubc.ca
phone / tél.: 1-604-822.1697
mobile: 778-386.4466

Current News

Dr. Dominique Weis presents series of invited lectures at Collège de France, Paris

October 12, 2021

Dr. Dominique Weis gave a series of invited public lectures at the prestigious Collège de France in Paris over the past several days. She discussed isotope geochemistry in a wide variety research applications, from volcanic mantle plumes, to the cleanliness of urban areas, to Indigenous archaeology. Dr. Weis was also presented with a medal from the Collège.

Dr. Weis receiving the Collège de France medal from Professor Barbara Romanowicz.
read more

International Day of Women and Girls in Science

February 10, 2021

Watch Dr. Dominique Weis and other women scientists at the Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences give sage advice to girls and young women who are thinking about a career in science. Video produced by the Pacific Museum of Earth, UBC.

Dr. Dominique Weis named a 2021 UBC University Killam Professor

January 14, 2021

Dr. Dominique Weis has been appointed as a 2021 University Killam Professor. This designation is the highest academic honour awarded to faculty members at the University of British Columbia, in recognition of exceptional and sustained excellence in research, teaching and mentoring.

Congratulations, Dominique!

Dr. Weis in the PCIGR lab. Photo credit: Paul Joseph, UBC.
read more

PCIGR researchers interviewed about lead in honey after 2019 Notre-Dame fire

July 29, 2020

PCIGR researchers PhD candidate Kate Smith and supervisor Dominique Weis talk to UBC Science, UBC News, and The New York Times about their latest research.

Smith_Weis-EST2020

Kate and Dominique used sensitive mass-spectrometer techniques to determine that the average concentration of lead in honey collected downwind of the Notre-Dame cathedral in Paris, three months after the devastating April 2019 fire, was around four times higher than lead levels in honey collected from the countryside and about three-and-a-half times higher than the urban honey collected before the fire. The research was published last week in Environmental Science & Technology Letters.

Despite these lead levels, all the honey collected for this study in and around Paris following the fire are still within the European Union’s safe levels for consumption.